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Monday, October 12, 2009

Horror Literature: Further Reading Suggestions

In the wake of the interest-piquing Horror Literature Top 30 from the Cyber-Horror Elite, I've been asked by a few people to make public the remaining novels, short stories and poems that did not make it onto either the main list itself, or the honorable mention list. And so, here it is, for your further edification!

So here are all the other works suggested by various members of the group, which didn't get enough quite enough votes to make the cut. Consider it a "Further Reading" list from your friends in the CHE...

NOVELS & NOVELLAS
1984 by George Orwell
American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis
Anno Dracula by Kim Newman
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
Cabal by Clive Barker
Carrie by Stephen King
Christine by Stephen King
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
Communion by Whitley Strieber
Dark Carnival by Ray Bradbury
The Descent by Jeff Long
The Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey
Handling the Undead by John Ajvide Lindqvist
Harvest Home by Thomas Tryon
Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons
House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
Jaws by Peter Benchley
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist
Lost Souls by Poppy Z. Brite
Merrick by Anne Rice
The Monk by Matthew Gregory Lewis
The Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Radcliffe
Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman
Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz
Perfume by Patrick Suskind
Ratman's Notebooks by Stephen Gilbert
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
Rosemary's Baby by Ira Levin
The Scream by John Skipp & Craig Spector
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris
Slumber Party by Christopher Pike
The Small Assassin by Ray Bradbury
Song of Kali by Dan Simmons
The Stand by Stephen King
The Traveling Vampire Show by Richard Laymon
The Vampire Lestat by Anne Rice
Varney the Vampire by James Malcolm Rymer
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

SHORT STORIES
"Berenice" by Edgar Allan Poe
"Bianca's Hands" by Theodore Sturgeon
"The Great God Pan" by Arthur Machen
"A Good Man Is Hard to Find" by Flannery O'Connor
"La Horla" by Guy de Maupassant
"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" by Washington Irving
"The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allan Poe
"Nightmare at 30,000 Feet" by Richard Matheson
"Pigeons from Hell" by Robert E. Howard
"The Relic" by Guy de Maupassant
"The Shadow Over Innsmouth" by H.P. Lovecraft
"The Thing on the Doorstep" by H.P. Lovecraft
"The White People" by Arthur Machen
"The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
"Young Goodman Brown" by Nathaniel Hawthorne

POEMS
"Annabel Lee" by Edgar Allan Poe
"Goblin Market" by Christina Rosetti
The Inferno by Dante Alighieri

OTHER
Macbeth by William Shakespeare (play)
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz (anthology)
The Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks (parody)

13 comments:

gord said...

Loving all the book stuff lately. I'll have to go through these one by one (the ones I don't know that is) and check them out.

Mike Snoonian said...

House of Leaves was one of scarier stories I've read in years. I kept having to put it down every hour or so lest I gave myself the wooly-boolies from prolonged reading.

Kostovoa's "The Historian" and Simmon's "Drood" are two of the finer historical fiction gothic horror novels to come out in a long while.

RayRay said...

All of this literature talk has stirred my memory, and I have remembered that Ray Bradbury had some very creepy short stories in an anthology my mother had when I was a kid. These included some titles such as The Night, The Coffin, and The City.

kindertrauma said...

Thanks B-Sol! This list should keep me very busy this winter!-Unk

Tiffani said...

You can tell I dont read much since this is the only one Im pointing out lol, but I loved Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. I used to get these from the library every Halloween. As a kid, the stories really scared me & I remember the illustraions being especially terrifying! Glad it made this list =)

Uranium Willy said...

Brian

I am able to post and send comments again. Usng a paid service called an SSL VPN. Not sure how long it will last. Ah, freedom. I had read Aws and for some reason did not consider it horror, but of course it is. Great idea here and a lot od these books, sad to admit, I have never heard of.

Bill @ The Uranium Cafe

le0pard13 said...

My thanks to B-Sol for posting this additional list. Some great titles and others worth looking into.

senski said...

Kudos to you, B-Sol, for all the work you've put into this survey. The list of also-rans is just fascinating...

StarryWonder said...

I may also suggest Jack Ketchum for some interesting horror novels.

B-Sol said...

Glad everyone is digging all the book stuff lately! Who says people don't read?

Yo_jimbo said...

These are all great, but wait I'm pretty sure there's someone missing...

Oh yeah! Ramsey frigging Campbell. A man who has won more awards for horror than any other writer. He is by far the best and most consistently terrifying horror writer I've read.

I'd suggest The Grin of the Dark for this list. My favourite novel of his that I've read so far.

You should be ashamed of yourselves :P .

RayRay said...

Wow, never heard of Ramsey "Friggin'" Campbell. I must be a failure as a nerd.

Yo_jimbo said...

As great as he is he's always struggled and never quite achieved the mainstream success he deserves. His books are also difficult to get hold of from anywhere else but the internet. He's definitely worth seeking out though. I find Stephen Jones' annual 'Best New Horror' series to be the best place for discovering under-the-radar horror authors. There's tons of great horror fiction being published on a regular basis. It's just a shame such a majority look down on what can be such a broad, literate and imaginative genre of wrtiting

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